Friday, 28 May 2010

Bringing on the wall, Day 36 - Dave tops out

Dave soon got to work this morning, doing the capping on the first part of the longest stretch of wall. It had been lovely to see him - last time was back in October when I dropped in some shopping as he was under the weather with an illness from which he's still recovering. We stopped abruptly, having hoped to finish that section before the winter, but no harm has been done by the frosts.
The tiles underneath the final capping are the original ones from this house - we had it re-roofed, with hand-made traditional tiles from a firm in Sussex; the Sage went with a lorry and fetched them himself. We kept the old ones of course, and are really pleased to find such an appropriate use for them.
Then he got on with the next section - as you see, the first level of tiles is in place, to be followed next by the second tiles and then the capping next time.

I, meanwhile, had twigged that there wasn't a job for me. The Sage doesn't believe in talking things through in advance, and I'd cancelled my usual Friday session at Year 9 music - if he'd said, I'd have gone along as usual. I'd been working in the garden for quite some time already in fact, as I had a sleepless night, awake after half an hour's nap at 1.15 and up from about 2.30. I did a particularly boring bit of work on the computer that I'm rather pleased to have got to grips with, well before the deadline, and was out before 6. It was a lovely day and I enjoyed planting the squashes that had been waiting in their pots.
I spent the rest of the morning forking over and weeding the next bed, in preparation for more squashes. I was quite tired and my back ached and the Sage was going to help me, but first he needed to make a phone call and then some people arrived to see him. How lucky can a man be? Anyway, I got it done. I was interested to note that I have become a left-footed digger, having been right-footed all my life. For the last two or three years I haven't been able to dig at all, having not enough strength either to put pressure on the spade or stand reliably on my right leg. I carefully placed all the plants with the use of a yardstick. The ground is very dry - I've watered thoroughly this afternoon. I've also weeded the greenhouse. I've put tomatoes, aubergines and peppers, sweet and hot, into pots this year, which are filled mostly with very well-rotted and completely odourless manure, and only planted the cucumbers direct into the bed. I found it impossible to keep up with the watering last year and am doing it differently this time. The pots are bottomless, so the roots can find coolness and moisture in the bed beneath.

There's still loads to do, though. I've got a busy weekend to come.

We had lunch on the lawn, with bantams, the cock pheasant and a large rabbit wandering around. They hardly bother to move out of the way when we approach.

16 comments:

savannah said...

now that's what i call a garden, sugar! we're doing square foot gardening, but have to have our little raised bed under a mesh cage, as the squirrels are quite ruthless around here! well done! xoxoxox

Z said...

It's an absurdly big vegetable patch, far more than I can look after, but I can't resist trying. The whole garden sprawls about but it's very neglected!

The Sage, while very much an animal-lover, makes an exception for squirrels because they raid nests and he loves birds - so squirrels are not allowed. However, pigeons and partridges make merry among the veggies and it's only recently that the bantams and rabbits were fenced out. The wall, of course, is to be the main rabbit-proofing strategy!

Gledwood said...

Do you know at first glance, I thought that was an opium patch~!!

Honestly I did!

I was illustrating my post on the world's narco-trade just before. And your blue, blue sky looked so very Golden Triangle..(!)

On a lighter note, what is a squash? Well I know it's a butternut thing. But I had never heard the term "squash" (apart from orange squash, lemon squash and we were squashed together like sardines in a tin"... until about 5 years ago, when suddenly it's all buternut squash and squish and squirt etc etc. Isn't there another word for them that we used to use?... If so what is it??!?

Gledwood said...

ps I THOUGHT that picture looked familiar ~~ you SURE Dave has never been in the Mujahadeen~??!?

mago said...

They're Weeding there, Gledwood.

Z said...

Ha ha - they're globe artichokes, not poppies! I'm afraid we're squeaky clean around here, Gled, not even a surreptitious cannabis plant among the cucumbers.

I think we used to call them pumpkins. But a pumpkin is a particular sort of squash. I grow lots of them (different varieties, not all butternut) because they cover the ground well, don't need much attention and Al can sell any number of them in the autumn.

You're right, Mago - I do grow weed - but not the illegal kind!

Caitlin said...

That is a magnificent wall. :-)

Marion said...

It's good news that you are feeling so much better physically. That cap on your wall just sets it off to perfection, doesn't it? Dave looks to have lost weight. Good thing you gave him lunch.

luckyzmom said...

The cap on the wall is perfect.

Dave said...

Marion needs her eyes testing. Nice lunch though.

Rog said...

"bantams, the cock pheasant and a large rabbit"

It does sound like a substantial lunch!

Z said...

I thought you looked thinner too, Dave.

Good thing I didn't mention the cows in the field, Rog. We did discuss the question of them coming to join us.

Christopher said...

Great artichokes. Much more advanced than mine. Dave looks fit and well. Must be all that Dream Topping.

Z said...

It's quite sheltered there and the cold winter doesn't seem to have done any harm. As you see, I haven't weeded there yet.

I suspect that Dave has a secret weakness for Dream Topping.

Roses said...

I meant to pop by earlier and say hi, your garden looks fantastic.

I saw Dave on Saturday and he said you ran at one point. Check you out hip replacement girl! xxx

Z said...

I ran? I didn't notice. Isn't that great?