Sunday, 3 July 2011

Parp, parp

The Sage fetched back his car today. It will be 83 years old in a month's time.
We went for a spin round the village.

And then we went and called on friends.

The car had gone about ten or twelve miles altogether, and was a bit hot and bothered by the time we got back into the drive, and we had cause to call it the Envy of Sisyphus (see end of section 3).  It started again after a rest, however.

On quite another subject, I have been thinking about surnames, specifically fish-related ones.  I'm not sure if it's because we live near the coast, in an area of the country that used to be a major fishing locality.  I know or have known people called Fish, Trout, Codling, Salmon and, splendidly, Haddock.

19 comments:

Alienne said...

The car is beautiful; and I daresay most 83 year olds might need a push after 12 miles!

I used to know someone who was always called Guppy; it was some years before I found out that was because his surname was Fish. I never found out his first name.

Marion said...

Love the car and the road trip. Lot of fun to be had at your blog today!

georgie said...

Love the photo of you and Sage touring about. Videos were fun too, wish they'd been longer.

Roses said...

Fantastic.

Good to see the car is running well, even if it got a bit hot under the collar.

Damn. I don't know anyone with a fish-related surname. I feel so provincial. The people I know have names like Gomez, Hererra and Lourenco.

Z said...

Clips more than about 10 seconds long just won't load, I've tried before.

There are people of the name of Herring in Lowestoft, as there should be, the silver darlings having once brought prosperity to the town, although I don't know them personally. Surnames used to be strongly rooted to their place of origin, although that's not nearly so much the case now, inevitably.

allotmentqueen said...

That car's got a lovely boot - just right for a picnic hamper.

Dave said...

I have nothing to add.

Christopher said...

Sorry - haven't been about much recently, but have been following momentous Zevents at a distance and particularly glad to note Envy of Sisyphus giving a little light relief tho' I daresay it seemed heavy enough at the time.

Pat said...

It's a spiffing little car.
We used to have a Nurse Fish and oddly she had fish eyes.

Rog said...

Lovely - reminded me of watching "Genevieve" on the School Projector in the Hall at Junior School - the scenery was perfect for the car. We were passed by a Steam Train at the weekend - I wonder if we've all fallen through a worm-hole.

Eddie 2-Sox said...

Peter Haddock is one of my favourite all-time Leeds players. Called Fish by us, the fans, he was limited in the talent department but overborne in determination. He played for Super Leeds in the mid to late 80s.

What a star. And what an era.


And that's a lovely motor.

63mago said...

Ha - what a goer!

Fish names? No, I am sorry, Franconia is all landlocked. Some old "speaking" family names - that is late medieval - survived in remote areas, like "Truckenbrod" (dry bread, trocken Brot), but no fish related names to my knowledge. "Haddock" reminded me of Captain Haddock: "Billions of blastering basteds!" "Hundertausend heulende Höllenhunde!" Ha!

fourdinners said...

What I'd give to be a Driving Instructor in THIS car!!!!

Z said...

It opens out into a dickey seat, too.

It was easier to push than I had imagined, although it did start anyway a few minutes later. But the chickens wanted their tea and I needed to start cooking our dinner, and it was quicker to push it than to sit and wait for it to settle down.

I took a mild interest in football in my teens, but never since, so I'm afraid I've never heard of him, Simon. In fact, I assumed that Haddock was a completely made-up name by the translators of the Tintin books.

There is, of course, Julian Bream, too.

Z said...

You need to double declutch, allow for a certain amount of play in the steering wheel and give plenty of time for braking, 4D! Having said that, it's fun to drive and easier than I expected before first trying it.

Mike and Ann said...

That looked fun. Reminds me of a Triumph Roadster we used to run.
P.s. Lots of Whitings in Suffolk.

Mike and Ann said...

P.P.S. Crabbe, Pike (stupid boy!), some Sturgeon near Stowmarket, and I used to know a family called Codling in Norfolk.
Hope this helps.
Probably a lot more if you went to Wales. Ouch! worthy of Rog at his worst.

Mike and Ann said...

PPPPs. And in Scotland, you might well find a family called MacKerel.

Alright, Sorry, I'll stop there. Goodnight.

Z said...

Haha! You're right though (maybe not about the MacKerel), I know someone called Whiting and someone called Sturgeon.