Tuesday, 29 June 2010

The Sage is happy

It's been a medical day today.  I went for my routine mammogram and the Sage went for his routine discussion with our doctor, having had the 24-hour blood pressure monitor last week.  I assume all's well with me - nothing on the photo made us go 'eek' but I'll hear in a couple of weeks, and all is well with the Sage.  I have not raised his blood pressure to eruption point yet.

I fetched Pugsley and Squiffany and brought them home.  Pugsley had a haircut the other day, having robustly refused one before - his mother was reduced to snipping off bits and he always looked a bit homespun.  However, he has reached the age of reason and visited the hairdresser at last.  As a result, he isn't always uncomfortably hot, so he was cheerful and calm, even when his ice lolly dripped.

The Sage was gone for ages.  A couple of hours.  He looked ever so cheerful when he got home and kissed me.  Yes, darlings, I know.  Then he produced from his pocket ... his diary.  A nice person, probably a cleaner, had handed it in and he received a phone call to say so, and had hot-wheeled it over to Norwich station.

After a brief and gentle shower, it's been another very hot day.  I do not complain.  I like it, and even those who long for shade would, most of them, grumble more if the weather was chilly.  One has to remember that 'not too hot' means 'too cold' or 'too wet and windy' or something equally undesirable.  I think this weather is delightful, because it's so rare for more than the odd day.

I took photos of vegetables - that is, botanically fruit but that's being a bit silly.  Peppers, courgettes, swiss chard and peas.  We ate some of the courgettes this evening.
Oh - and, as last year, the outdoor tomatoes are going to be ready earlier than the greenhouse ones. Next year, I must try more bush varieties.

The funny thing is that I didn't actually grow any yellow courgettes this year.  I grew Defender and Romanesco, both green.  Yet I have a plant with yellow fruit.  I don't mind at all, but odd it is.

15 comments:

Blue Witch said...

I think that there are more and more seeds (and bulbs) mis-sold. I'm getting quite annoyed about it actually. Might produce a standard letter and send it to all offenders...

luckyzmom said...

Loved the pictures and correctly identified all but the first which I thought were pattipan squash. Guess I've been too long from the vine!

My taste is much too grand. With few exceptions I was attracted to items that were estimated at least3000. I did enjoy shopping.

Z said...

I often find stray seedlings in a tray nowadays, which never used to happen. And bought compost has weed seeds in - I know that it's recycled nowadays rather than new peat, but if there are viable seeds, what sort of diseases could have survived?

Well, they are rather yellow bell peppers, it's just the leaves that give it away.

yes indeed. We like the expensive things too, mostly. The thing is, we've been interested a long time, so it's mostly rare or very early things that appeal.

63mago said...

Its a fine thing, that The Sage got his diary back!

Blue Witch said...

I'll bet that had the Sage lost an electronic diary, he wouldn't have got it back. Trraditional is best.

Dave said...

I only use a desk diary these days, which makes it fairly unlikely that I will lose it. Unless I mislay my desk, of course.

Z said...

Well. I lost my iPhone a few months back. The man who found it phoned someone on my contact list who phoned me and we met for him to give it back. He has one too, so knew how much it would mean to me.

I am, of course, extremely lucky, but it would be churlish of me to be cynical, when my experience is that people are lovely.

Z said...

You have no need of something sensational to read on the train, Dave, it seems.

Christopher said...

Very relieved to discover that these photos aren't mammogram scans.

Z said...

Oh, Chris. What a thought.

Rog said...

Your corgettes are weeks in front of ours. Must be the further Eastness.

63mago said...

These pictures are so - green.
And you say each shows something different?

Fascinating.

This is no sarcasm, I simply must rub my last two braincells together to see a difference. Its like sorts of wood: Its wood. I am no carpenter. If its something manmade, like incunabula ... :)

Z said...

I did start them off in the greenhouse, Rog, but Dave had nothing to do with them.

Three of the pictures are different varieties of courgettes, but you can only really tell by the colour of the fruit. I'm afraid I can tell different woods too, although not as well as the Sage.

I envy your expertise in incunabula. I once held a printed book dating from 1485 and was deeply impressed. I wish I owned one - or at least was the custodian for a generation.

63mago said...

They are simply great. The manuscript departement of the Uni Library has some.
If I ever will have the chance to work in my own field again I will have to deal mostly with literature of the 16th and very early 17th century, most Henricpetri-volumes and what the humanists produced.
It's astounding: When something new comes into the world or is invented, it most often comes in its best form first - best on arrival. The sheer quality of the print and the beauty of the page later only was reached by small free presses - Liebhaberdrucken.
These books own themselves, we only take care of them for a while.

Z said...

Dear Mago, what an example of what bloggers always say - that the comments are so often the best part. You are right, and you put it beautifully.